The Pyeongchang Winter Olympics was the target of a cyber attack that downed its website and internet and television services during the Games’ opening ceremony.

Officials in charge of the event, which is being held in South Korea and holds political significance for relations between North and South Korea, have refused to reveal the source of the attack.

Reports state that just before the start of the opening ceremony, the official site for the Games stopped working, leaving visitors unable to print tickets or access information. The wifi in the stadium also reportedly went down.

There has been much speculation about the possible source of the attacks, with Russia being the main suspect. Part of the reason for this is because the country was barred from taking place in the Olympics after a major state-sponsored doping program was exposed to have taken place at the 2014 Games in Sochi.

However, International Olympic Committee (IOC) officials would not confirm the source. IOC spokesman Mark Adams said: “Maintaining secure operations is our purpose. We are not going to comment on the issue. It is one we are dealing with. We are making sure our systems are secure and they are secure.”

Speaking to reporters after the attacks, Pyeongchang organizing committee spokesman Sung Baik-you said: “All issues were resolved and recovered yesterday morning. We know the cause of the problem but that kind of issues occurs frequently during the Games. We decided with the IOC we are not going to reveal the source (of the attack).”

Although the games are taking place only 50 miles from the border between North and South Korea, few believe that the Olympics host’s neighbours are responsible for the attack.

Though North Korea is notorious for carrying out cyber attacks, the country has made a concerted and unusual effort to behave diplomatically during the Games, with Kim Jong-Un’s sister attending and shaking hands with the South Korean president.