Vocus has been left red-faced after a video showing a broken front door at one of its data centres went viral on Twitter

Twitter user Liam Farr has embarrassed Oceanic data infrastructure firm Vocus after a video he posted on Twitter showed the security gate and front door at one of its NZ data centres could be brushed aside.

Both the outside gate and facility door have intercom and swipe card access to prevent unauthorised outsiders from entering the facility. But Liam’s video shows that the entrances are long overdue a service after the Auckland resident simply breezed past them by pushing them open.

To Vocus’ horror, Farr – who graduated in Electrotechnology Engineering from AUT – uploaded the video with viral exposure in mind, giving it the amusing and mockery-maximising title “How to break into a datacenter”.

The video, which is approaching 400 retweets, 1000 likes and 86,000 views – finishes with Farr saying ‘congratulations you have gained entry’.

As tweets of outrage and disbelief mounted below, Vocus NZ had no choice but to respond to the video:

But to add insult to injury, the reply only prompted Farr to point out that the broken door was not a recent issue. He responded by claiming the door had been broken for “~6 months on and off”. Farr added that before posting the video exposé, he went through official channels to report the fault on multiple occasions.

Speaking to itnews Australia, a Vocus spokesperson was keen to offer reassurances that the main facility door leading to the racks and servers was not compromised, and that no one had gained unauthorised access to the facility.

“While being able to access the foyer of the facility was a failure, it’s extremely important to note that the facility has 2FA card and biometric security, secure mantrap areas, 24/7 surveillance and at no time was the data centre accessible to unauthorised persons.”

But again Farr had the last word… posting a picture that revealed the door to the data floor was far(r) from foolproof:

Vocus said they have since fixed the faulty look on the front door of the facility and would be ‘conducting an audit into the failure of the front door and contractors who undertook the work’.

“The security of our premises is paramount to our business, and we are taking this very seriously,” the spokesperson said.