Managed service provider Six Degrees has added to its portfolio of data centres in the UK in order to entice in more public sector customers.

Carrenza, the public sector arm of Six Degrees, is adding two new availability zones through government accredited Ark Data Centres, allowing the company to hold data at government ‘official and above’ classifications.

The site of the two new zones, housed in Corsham and Farnborough, also play host to Crown Hosting Data Centres, a joint project between Ark and the Cabinet Office, designed specifically for supplying colocation services for the UK public sector.

This expansion means that Six Degrees now has four UK availability zones. The company provides cloud managed services, with support for AWS and Azure. According to the company, its IaaS offering is designed to help public sector organisations use the cloud without the expense of carrying out a full digital transformation program.

Six Degrees of data protection

It does this, it says, by acting as the bridge between existing outsourcing agreements and public cloud providers. Because of Ark’s government accreditation, Six Degrees can now offer more services to public sector organisations.

“Cloud technology is a fundamental aspect of many successful IT environments. But public sector organisations have more restrictions than the average business, from budget to compliance, which can make cloud adoption challenging,” said James Henigan, Cloud Services Director, Six Degrees.

“By supporting Crown Hosting Data Centres Ltd and working with Ark Data Centres we are confident that we can bring a tailored cloud offering to the public sector and enable more organisations to take advantage of this technology and better serve constituents.”

Thomas Konopka, from Carrenza, added that public sector organisations are in need of further innovation. “We have found that public sector organisations often lag behind in adoption of technology advancements and we feel that in supporting Crown Hosting Data Centres Ltd, we can make it far easier for them to develop their digital transformation strategies in line with other industries that have less data restrictions.”

Public sector use of the cloud has grown in recent years, after initial fears about security and data protection were slowly assuaged. A UK government document said in 2017 that ‘it’s possible for public sector organisations to safely put highly personal and sensitive data into the public cloud.’