Credit: Sparkcity/Miris

Norwegian real estate firm Miris has released plans for a power-positive city planned around a central 2MW data centre which would return heat to its citizens.

The company has developed The Spark, a prototype model for data centres. In this model, sustainable data centre sites are placed in urban areas with the intention of fuelling a power-positive city around them.

The planned data centres will do this by creating a ‘smart loop’, whereby the heat generated by the data centre goes into the city to heat homes and other sites. That water then returns to the data centre to cool it.

Norwegian

Plans for the ‘smart loop’ system. Credit: Sparkcity/Miris

Miris has collaborated with names such as Snøhetta, Skanska, Asplan Viak and Nokia on the plans. The ultimate intention is to create a city which produces more power than it uses – hence ‘power-positive.’

The model is based on a 2MW, 200 rack facility. The idea, Miris says, is to fill the data centre in stages, with the facility having the ability to scale in height and length depending on requirements.

Power-positive plans

This ‘Power City’ plan stems from the Powerhouse coalition, which aims for ‘plus energy buildings’. These are buildings ‘that produces more clean energy over its lifespan than has been used to produce construction materials, construct the building, operate it and modify it for the next owner.’

According to Miris, the heating requirements of the proposed power-positive city matches the heat from the data centre, and roof area throughout the city allows for enough energy to be produced through solar energy. For a 2MW data centre, the company says, a city of 18,000 inhabitants is suitable.

The Nordics are renowned for their sustainable data centre plans. The world’s largest green data centre was announced in Norway last year, which will sit within the Arctic Circle.

Engineers in Stockholm have also created a system through which excess data centre heat warms homes in the city.