Swedish prefabricated data centre manufacturer has been commissioned to build 20 data centres across Australia by telecoms provider Virtutel.

Initially deploying in Albury, New South Wales, the Australian telecommunications firm will establish facilities in regional cities across the country, through its data centre subsidiary VirtuDC.

The project is part of the company’s wider intention to establish a set of interconnected carrier-neutral data centres all over the country, in order to be able to serve technologies that require low latency connections at ‘the edge’, such as IoT devices and driverless cars.

Swedish firm Flexenclosure specialises in setting up data centre facilities in extremely challenging environments, though this is its first project in the continent of Oceania. This project looks to set up sites in ‘presently underserved areas’, over the next three years.

“We are delighted to establish this strategic partnership with Virtutel and excited to play a role in the execution of their vision for a new network of edge data centres in Australia,” said Flexenclosure CEO, David King.

“This also marks our entry into yet another new continent, further expanding our global footprint for our eCentre data centres.”


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Virtutel managing director, David Allen, said: “We selected Flexenclosure for their deep experience in deploying prefabricated data centres in very challenging environments and their flexibility in making sure that the ultimate design was exactly what we wanted.

“We are confident that Flexenclosure is the right partner for what is to be a significant rollout of IT infrastructure across Australia.”

The custom-designed ‘eCentre’ prefabricated data centres will be Tier III certified, with the base design standardised across all the new facilities. This will give Virtutel significant efficiency savings, particularly in terms of power, cooling and maintenance.

The sites will have space for both horizontal and vertical expansion and, where necessary, will have ‘dark site’ functionality – the ability to continue running unmanned, while being managed from a central network operations centre. The Swedish firm will continue to provide support services to Virtutel.