Southeast Asia’s largest bank, DBS, has announced a partnership with Equinix to cut costs at one of its traditional Singapore data centres through cloud optimisation.

Singapore based DBS will move its main data centre from its current premises to one a quarter of the size, making it 75% cheaper to run.

According to the firm, the move is a result of years of work on migrating to cloud-optimised technology, which it argues has both saved it money and increased storage and computing capacity by a factor of seven. These years of work have also provided its staff with the ability to create a more efficient infrastructure, it states.

The partnership with Equinix is intended to improve scalability and agility for the bank, improve its cloud infrastructure, and help DBS hit its sustainability targets by improving energy efficiency by at least 10 times.


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“By being a leader in adopting cloud technologies, DBS can deliver more customer value through our ability to experiment and scale quickly. Our teams are able to iterate and deliver products to our customers at a much faster rate, while adhering to the highest standards of security and resiliency,” said DBS Group chief CIO and head of technology and operations, David Gledhill.

“With the new cloud data centre, we are able to significantly increase our energy efficiency as well as drastically reduce our carbon footprint,” he added.

The firm has a background of cloud adoption. It has previously announced its intention to move half of its compute workload to the public cloud by 2018, and has partnerships with AWS and Pivotal Cloud Foundry, which it states allows for improved innovation and operation times.

As a result of these moves, and its switch to Office 365, it now operates in a hybrid cloud environment, with the intention of being ready for rapid changes in both storage and compute.

The commitment to cloud, of which its move to a cloud-optimised data centre is one part, is driven by the need to adapt to the way the way its customers bank, states the firm. It notes that 60% of its customers open their accounts online, and as such it wants to have an entirely ‘digital’ process – from client-facing functions to backend processes.