A Fujitsu Australia data centre has suffered an outage causing downtime and data loss at an Australian bank.

The data centre in Homebush, near Sydney, went down between 9.24pm on Saturday night and 3am on Sunday.

It has been reported that the downtime caused unrecoverable data loss of testing and development data that had been running on virtual machines at a major Australian financial institution.

The outage did not directly affect operations at the bank except for forcing it to redo development work.

In a statement, a Fujitsu spokesperson said: ‘A storage array in Fujitsu’s Homebush data centre became unavailable at 9.24pm on Saturday night and has affected services to customers. We are treating this matter as a major incident and we have activated our internal crisis management processes.’

The spokesperson stated that the unit was up and running again by 3am on Sunday and that the company is continuing ‘resolution activity’ in order to restore services to customers.

The company recently announced that it had achieved Australia’s first Uptime Institute Tier IV Design Certification for an enterprise-scale data centre, following an upgrade at its Malaga data centre in Western Australia.

That move came as part of a $100m (approx. £61 million) investment strategy, with an aim to upgrade its strategic data centre facilities for Fujitsu’s enterprise customers.

The development came as part of Fujitsu’s broader goal in Oceania, which it calls the Roadmap to 2025, announced in 2015. The strategy looks to take advantage of improving infrastructure in the area and to ‘maximise performance, reliability, data security and sustainability in its data centre footprint of seven sites across Australia.’

CEO of Fujitsu for Australia and New Zealand, Mike Foster, said at the time: ‘This data centre Roadmap continues our long-standing leadership in facility operation and infrastructure connectivity. Its vision is designed to meet the challenges of digital transformation and the data needs of our hyperconnected world into the next decade.’