HPE has signalled its intention of focussing on its hybrid IT business division by appointing chief sales officer Phil Davis as permanent president of hybrid IT.

In a blog post, the company’s CEO Antonio Neri gave Davis a vote of confidence, arguing that the new president will be able to provide a ‘hugely valuable … customer-first approach.’

The hybrid IT business group was created at the start of this year and brought together the entire infrastructure, software and services capabilities of HPE into one organisation. The intention of this group, Neri writes, is to ‘better address the integrated technology needs of our customers.’

David led that group on an interim basis since its formation and now the company has opted to keep him there on a permanent basis. In his role, he will lead the division which consists of three units – Hybrid IT Infrastructure, Software-Defined & Cloud, and HPE Pointnext as well as Global Operations and Global Sales.

If you’re HPE and you know it clap your hands

These individual units will continue to be led by their existing bosses – Alain Andreoli in infrastructure, Ric Lewis in software-defined, and Arun Chandra in operations. As part of the restructuring, though, the existing leader of Pointnext, Ana Pinczuk, will be leaving the company.

Pointnext is a division from HPE designed to ‘smooth the transition’ for companies as they look to become digital businesses. Fluffy as that sounds, many IT vendors are transitioning towards an advisory role, including Google in its cloud business.

Neri writes that Pinczuk led the Pointnext team through a time of transformation, and that she was instrumental in the company’s move towards ‘everything-as-a-service.’

Those with a more cynical outlook will take the restructuring with a pinch of salt, with the company having struggled in recent years as it struggled to keep its business model successful and relevant in the changing IT environment.

Meg Whitman, the company’s former CEO, led it through a series of job cuts and downsizing, as well as the break up of Hewlett Packard and HPE.