Hewlett Packard Enterprise has announced it will acquire Boston-based consultancy firm Cloud Technology Partners (CTP) as it moves to assert its position in the global hybrid cloud market.

CTP supports large organisations with their cloud migration and IT transformation journeys, from advising on on-premises data centre solutions to SaaS delivery strategies. HPE hopes that the new addition will help it boost its consultancy capabilities and ability to aid clients in implementing effective hybrid cloud deployments.

HPE will also inherit CTP’s hybrid cloud management suite, Managed Cloud Controls, which is designed for customers struggling to deal with the complexity of managing hybrid infrastructure, compliance issues and cost efficiencies.

‘Businesses today live in a Hybrid IT world. Achieving business outcomes requires putting each workload in the appropriate environment, whether it’s in an on-premises data center, in a private cloud, on public clouds or offered as a SaaS application,’ HPE said in a statement.

The company added: ‘We believe most enterprises will operate in this Hybrid IT environment for the foreseeable future.’

HPE referenced recent research by McKinsey & Company which highlighted that businesses are spending an average of $6 million each year on hybrid IT consultancy services and cloud native deployments.

According to the announcement, CTP is experienced with a wide variety of public and private cloud platforms including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and OpenStack.

Specific terms of the agreement have not yet been disclosed.

HPE has acquired a series of cloud companies over the course of 2017 in an effort to expand its hybrid cloud offering. In May, HPE purchased Nimble Storage for an estimated $1.2 billion (approx. £920 million), adding further cloud-based management and predictive analytics capabilities to its repertoire.

In February, the company also completed its acquisition of SimpliVity, a provider of software-defined and hyper-converged infrastructure.