Microsoft has bought Cycle Computing for an undisclosed sum, in a move that will secure more customers for Azure, and likely take some away from AWS and Google.

Cycle has played an integral role in the development of cloud computing, in particular in the running of large apps for businesses.

Its products have been used by all three major cloud players; AWS, Google, and Azure. It also developed products that allow multiple virtual computers to work together effectively as one supercomputer – a type of orchestration that is now commonplace.

Another example of Cycle being ahead of the game was back in 2012 when scientists used Cycle software to run a drug testing app across thousands of virtual computers in Amazon’s data centres.

Cycle Computing CEO, Jason Stowe, is clearly proud of the work his organisation has achieved since it was set up using an $8000 credit card loan in 2005. In a statement, he said: ‘We had the rare opportunity to invent and lead a product category, Cloud HPC (high performance computing), drive customer adoption, push the boundaries of what can be done, and execute our vision of changing the world for the better.’

He also seems to be happy with the move to Azure, stating that he’s ‘psyched’ given their shared attitude towards solving problems using cloud HPC.

From now onwards, all Cycle products will be housed in Azure. This means that Cycle, a very popular cloud computing software company, that runs massive apps for big businesses, will be using Microsoft’s cloud service exclusively.

Cycle customers that use other cloud providers, such as AWS or Google, will be looked after by Microsoft, though they will first be asked if they’d like to migrate.

Microsoft is looking to make that process as easy as possible. It said: ‘We are committed to providing customers a seamless migration experience to Azure if and when they choose to migrate.’