Docker has today announced the launch of a new platform dedicated to enabling businesses to manage workloads as containerised applications within the data centre or in public clouds.

Following six months of private beta trials, the Docker Datacenter (DDC) is immediately available as an integrated suite, offering current open source features such as the Docker Engine and Docker Swarm. New commercial tools will also be supported including Docker Universal Control Plane and Docker Trusted Registry.

Docker has labelled the new solution as a ‘Containers-as-a-Service’ (CaaS) solution, and is able to run on top of cloud infrastructures such as OpenStack or VMware, and public clouds like Amazon Web Services (AWS), and even across bare metal infrastructure.

While the company has been around as a container platform for almost three years, Docker said that many businesses had been calling for support with their application development lifecycle and integration with the rest of their IT operations, in addition to just managing deployment.

The company said that the new DDC capabilities will now offer developers freedom, while providing IT teams oversight and operational control.

Commenting on the new platform, DevOps solutions architect at Healthdirect Australia, Scott Coulton said: “[DDC] provides us with a solid foundation for our container environment, enabling our team to spend more time developing and shipping the applications that bring our customers value.

“DDC also abstracts the operations tasks away from the dev team […] As all devops teams know, less time on operations means more spent on development, giving you greater agility in bringing your applications to market,” Coulton added.

According to Docker, most of DDC is based on open-source projects and feedback from the ecosystem. This experience means that the existing APIs allow the platform to integrate seamlessly with a range of tool suites for monitoring and logging, and with VMware and Cisco stacks for networking. The only requirement is the Linux kernel, but Docker has confirmed that it will run across any Linux distribution.